Peces Criollos - Freshwater Fishes of Argentina Peces Criollos - Freshwater Fishes of Argentina
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Gymnotus cuia sp.nov. from Argentina, Paraguay and Uruguay

Gymnotus cuia
Gymnotus cuia
 (photo from publication)

new species from Argentina, Paraguay and Uruguay:
Gymnotus cuia Craig, Malabarba, Crampton & Albert, 2018

published in:
Craig, J.M., L.R. Malabarba, W.G.R. Crampton & J.S. Albert (2018):
Revision of Banded Knifefishes of the Gymnotus carapo and G. tigre clades (Gymnotidae Gymnotiformes) from the Southern Neotropics.
Zootaxa 4379 (1): 47-73

abstract (from publication):
Banded Knifefishes (Gymnotus, Gymnotidae) comprise the most species-rich, ecologically tolerant (eurytopic), and geographically widespread genus of Neotropical electric fishes (Gymnotiformes), with 40 valid species occupying most habitats and regions throughout the humid Neotropics. Despite substantial alpha-taxonomic work in recent years, parts of the genus remain characterized by taxonomic confusion. Here we describe and delimit species of the G. carapo and G. tigre clades from the southern Neotropics, using body proportions (caliper-based morphometrics), fin-ray, scale and laterosensory-pore counts (meristics), quantitative shape differences (geometric morphometrics), osteology, color patterns and electric organ discharges. We report these data from 174 Gymnotus specimens collected from 100 localities throughout the southern Neotropics, and delimit species boundaries in a multivariate statistical framework. We find six species of the G. carapo clade (G. carapo australisG. cuia n. sp., G. chimarraoG. omarorumG. pantanal, and G. sylvius), and two species of the G. tigre clade (G. inaequilabiatus and G. paraguensis) in the southern Neotropics. The new species G. cuia is readily distinguished from the morphologically similar and broadly sympatric G. c. australis by a shorter head and deeper head and body, and from the morphologically similar and sympatric G. omarorum by fewer lateral-line ventral rami and fewer pored lateral-line scales anterior to the first ventral ramus. We also review the geographic distributions of all eight species of the G. carapo and G. tigre clades in the southern Neotropics, showing that G. cuia is the most widespread species in the region. These results affirm the importance of understanding the structure of variation within and between species, both geographic and ontogenetic, in delimiting species boundaries.

Crenicichla yjhui sp.nov. from Argentina

Hoplias argentinensis sp.nov. from Argentina

Serrapinnus kriegi - first record from Uruguay

Microglanis cottoides - not a species from Argentina

Austrolebias wichi sp.nov.

Jenynsia lineata is a sr. synonym of J. multidentata

Gymnotus cuia sp.nov. from Argentina, Paraguay and Uruguay

Gymnotus paraguensis - first record from Uruguay

Gymnogeophagus taroba sp.nov. from Argentina

Cetopsorhamdia iheringi - first record from Argentina

Poecilia reticulata - first record from Argentina

Acipenser gueldenstaedtii - first record from Argentina

Gymnogeophagus constellatus - first record from Argentina

CLOFFAR - update 4

Gymnotus carapo - confirmed for Argentina & G. c. australis ssp.nov.

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